The Story of ‘Our Grandad and his Box’.

What’s in the Box?

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Somewhere, everywhere there are boxes. Hidden in our cupboards, drawers and dark corners. Once loved and cherished for the secrets or treasures that were held most dear, but time moves on and so do we. Our boxes are lost and forgotten, even discarded or abandoned to their fate, but not always. Some are rescued against all odds, like a message in a bottle. Are you the keeper of such treasures? Where are they now?

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Grandad’s box is not large and has little monetary value but was dear to him and kept ‘squirrelled away’ through the best and worst of times. Occasionally, it saw the light of day, reassured him and was gone again. He knew it would eventually come to me and it would be safe. Trust is an amazing phenomenon.  Now, it is our only ‘real’ connection with him. I cannot divulge his ‘treasures’ except to tell you that all is not what it seems. Of course there is a box within a box and the original battered metal one has been replaced by the wooden cigar box.

Such a ‘hoard’ may include a ring, a piece of jewellery, a button, a postcard, a photo or album, a stamp, a letter, a book, a telegram, some tickets, ribbons, money, newspaper clippings, trophies, maps, brochures, service records and certificates or other legal documents which often divulge more than what first meets our eye. A little time may reveal initials, names, dates, places, likes, dislikes, or even a glimmer of their personality or relationship to one another. So tantalizingly near, but often so far away.

Have another look inside one of your boxes, is there something that’s always been there that you’ve missed? If you take a photo it may help to make the details clearer or jog your memory. Talk about it. Perhaps, in a day or two, you might even remember a snippet of conversation, a family tale, a face or a connection. Now consider… have you found any more clues to add to the story of your ‘Grandad and his box’ ? I hope so.

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